Three key comms lessons from the Samsung crisis

Unlike its Galaxy Note 7 phone, it is unlikely Samsung’s reputation will go up in flames as a result of its current PR crisis.

But with vast amounts of negative news coverage and social media chatter and shares taking a battering, it has undoubtedly been a hugely embarrassing and painful time for the South Korean electronics giant and it will have to work hard to regain consumer trust.

Just last month the company was being heralded for its initial handling of the crisis after it quickly announced a recall of the new smartphones following report of the devices catching fire.

Now it seems that praise may have been misplaced and that the actions were driven by panic and the need for a quick fix, rather than a well thought out strategy.

 

Quick fix

Sure, the product recall was the right thing to do, but announcing the problem had been solved – Tim Baxter the company’s President said last month ‘to be clear, the Note7 with the new battery is safe’ - only to see replacement devices combust, suggests the cause of the issue was never fully properly resolved.

In a crisis media management situation, customers do want to see you act quickly and decisively, but they don’t want to see those actions come at the cost of being exposed to the same problem again – particularly when it includes fire.

Equally, if you are going to announce that the problem has been resolved, you need to be absolutely certain that really is the case.

Being rash with your messaging during a crisis can be just as damaging as moving too slowly or saying nothing at all.

'Being rash with your messaging during a crisis can be just as damaging as moving too slowly' via @mediafirstltd http://bit.ly/2dRRHYb

 

Apology?

When you have tested your customers’ loyalty not just once but twice, you might think an apology would be forthcoming.

But it is hard to find any apologetic language in anything Samsung has said so far. Its statement earlier this week announcing it would stop sales of the phone, said ‘consumers’ safety remains our top priority’ but that aside the language is official and dull.

 

Samsung.jpg 

 

Sorry should have been the first thing it said in its media statement – it’s a golden rule of the crisis communication playbook. You need to show your customers they are upmost in your thoughts, you understand the severity of what happened and the impact it has had, particularly if you want to avoid them moving over to the products offered by your rivals in a crowded marketplace.

Phrases like ‘deeply sorry’ and ‘deep regret’ should be appearing at the start of statements and in any media interviews the company’s spokespeople carry out. But, and this is really important, these spokespeople need to use language that they are comfortable with – that is genuine and heartfelt. There’s nothing worse than a poorly trained spokesperson delivering clichéd messages.

'There’s nothing worse than a poorly trained spokesperson delivering clichéd messages' via @mediafirstltd http://bit.ly/2dRRHYb 

 

Who is in charge?

And the media interview part brings me on to another learning point. We have seen statements from Samsung, but that’s about it.

We don’t seem to have a face of someone who is leading the response to crisis and addressing the media. Where is the public face of Samsung? Who is fighting to get this resolved on behalf of the customers?

In a crisis of this magnitude you would expect the CEO to be playing a visible role in trying to repair the damage by showing strong leadership and getting reassuring messages out to customers (and shareholder) through the media.

Look how visible Nick Varney, the chief executive of Merlin Entertainments was during its crisis following a serious accident on a ride at its Alton Towers theme park.

'Where is the public face of Samsung? Who is fighting to get this resolved for customers?' via @mediafirstltd http://bit.ly/2dRRHYb

 

Time will tell just how damaging ‘Galaxy gate’ will be for Samsung’s reputation but the story is not going to go away and a failure to handle it better will only boost its rivals.  

 

Media First are media and communications training specialists with over 30 years of experience. We have a team of trainers, each with decades of experience working as journalists, presenters, communications coaches and media trainers. 

Click here to find out more about our highly practical crisis communication courses.

 

Subscribe here to be among the first to receive our blogs.

 

 

Our Services

Media First are media and communications training specialists with over 30 years of experience. We have a team of trainers, each with decades of experience working as journalists, presenters, communications coaches and media trainers.

Online learning
Training by videoconference
Media training
Message development and testing
Presentation skills training
Crisis management testing
Crisis communication training
Leadership communication training
Writing skills training
Social media training
Video sound bites
Identifying positive media stories
How to film and edit professional video on a mobile
Media skills refresher
Media skills
TV studios
Crisis communications

Recommended Reading

Media Skills Training, Spokesperson training, Crisis management — 26 October by Adam Fisher

Could you handle an interview with this hard-hitting journalist?

Delegates on our media training courses often have a fear that they are going to be put through a Jeremy Paxman style interrogation. Others fear facing combative interviews from the likes of Nick…

Spokesperson training, TV interview skills, Radio interview skills, Crisis management — 21 October by Adam Fisher

What does it feel like to be on a media training course?

Have you ever wondered what it feels like to take part in one of our media training courses? Well, one of our clients, Lymphoma Action, allowed us to shadow their course so that others could see how…